Tuesday, October 21, 2014

What To Wear When You’re On The Run From The NSA

In the documentary film “Citizenfour" by Laura Poitras, it’s revealed that Edward Snowden’s longtime girlfriend Lindsay Mills also left the United States and joined Snowden in Russia. Cheekily, Vogue suggests a trio of outfits for Mills, to match both the climate and the need for discretion that comes with proximity to the source of a major intelligence leak.

We analyzed the looks at Popular Science.

Monday, October 20, 2014
This year the RW-2X—built for $100,000—won 3rd place in the Isle of Man TT Zero, a zigzagging 38-mile motorcycle race. Other teams spent $6M or more winning 1st and 2nd. “I like to say we got 90% of the performance for 1/100th of the cost,” says team member @aaronbeekay (at OSU Center for Automotive Research)

This year the RW-2X—built for $100,000—won 3rd place in the Isle of Man TT Zero, a zigzagging 38-mile motorcycle race. Other teams spent $6M or more winning 1st and 2nd. “I like to say we got 90% of the performance for 1/100th of the cost,” says team member @aaronbeekay (at OSU Center for Automotive Research)

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

This algorithm mimics fish schools so well it fooled experts, because science is awesome.

For more on the research, and to test your skills at distinguishing real swimmers from their digital cousins, head to Popular Science.

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

The Sun Gives Off A Jack-O’-Lantern Leer

The sun got into the Halloween spirit a little early this year, producing active spots that look like a jack-o’-lantern leer on October 8.

More at Popular Science.

Sunday, October 5, 2014
A 1998 study on the Maillard reaction, a breakdown of proteins in high heat that causes browning, specifically regarding milk (e.g. in the egg wash used on these pies): “The final stage, in which melanoidins (brown pigments) are formed and protein polymerization occurs, is largely unknown from a chemical point of view, let alone quantitatively.” Pretty much covers the magic here.

A 1998 study on the Maillard reaction, a breakdown of proteins in high heat that causes browning, specifically regarding milk (e.g. in the egg wash used on these pies): “The final stage, in which melanoidins (brown pigments) are formed and protein polymerization occurs, is largely unknown from a chemical point of view, let alone quantitatively.” Pretty much covers the magic here.

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Would You Swallow This?

Researchers hope the mechanical, needle-studded pill in this screenshot could one day replace some injections. More on the technology at Popular Science.

(Screenshot courtesy MIT.)

From Our October Issue: Asteroid Blasting 2.0

After a dysfunctional Hayabusa mission returned to Earth in 2003 with a measly 0.1 milligram of asteroid dust, Japan’s Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) didn’t give up—it doubled down. In December, the $310-million Hayabusa 2 will launch on an intercept course with a 900-meter-wide asteroid between the orbits of Earth and Mars. Sometime in 2018, the craft will blast its target with a missile, sweep the unweathered surface to harvest samples, then head home with the very first virgin asteroid debris ever collected. Or so we hope.

More on Hayabusa 2 at Popular Science.

(Graphic by Don Foley/Story by Jeremy Hsu)

How The U.S. Will Stop Ebola Within Its Borders

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During their visits, tracers ask the traced people how they’re feeling. Tracers may ask the traced contacts to take their temperature every day and record it. Tracers, who are often recruited from the community, don’t need any special medical training. They submit their findings to trained epidemiologists, who decide what to do next.

More on how officials expect “good old legwork” to prevent the spread of Ebola in the United States

(Presentation slide from Community Health Care Association Of New York State)

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Something New Up Above

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It’s hard to tell as a human, but the atmosphere can behave a lot like the sea. Evidence: these strange waves in the above time-lapse. More on what could be a brand new cloud formation at Popular Science.

(GIF courtesy of Alex Schueth)

Monday, September 29, 2014
Portal 2 kicks Lumosity’s ass. Val Shute, a psychology of education researcher, on the value of Valve’s puzzler vs. an extremely popular brain-training app.