Thursday, August 21, 2014
Bill Nye Fights Back!

"Let’s say that I am, through my actions, doomed, and that I will go to hell. Even if I am going to hell, that still doesn’t mean the Earth is 6,000 years old. The facts just don’t reconcile.” -Bill Nye

For our September 2014 cover story on education, we asked writer Ryan Bradley to follow Bill Nye around before his public throwdown with creationist Ken Ham.
The story is as epic as The Science Guy’s right hook, so don’t miss it.

Bill Nye Fights Back!

"Let’s say that I am, through my actions, doomed, and that I will go to hell. Even if I am going to hell, that still doesn’t mean the Earth is 6,000 years old. The facts just don’t reconcile.” -Bill Nye

For our September 2014 cover story on education, we asked writer Ryan Bradley to follow Bill Nye around before his public throwdown with creationist Ken Ham.

The story is as epic as The Science Guy’s right hook, so don’t miss it.

Friday, June 13, 2014

WE NEED YOUR SCIENCE JOKES!

asapscience:

image

Hi lovely followers!

We really, really like science jokes and we really, really want your help in compiling the best ones specifically about LOVE and RELATIONSHIPS. 

Send us a message or reblog and comment and let us know! 

Use chromosomes in advertisements — because, you know, sex cells."—@BayleePulliam

On March 24th, 2014, we asked our Twitter followers, “What’s your favorite science joke?”

The nerds delivered. Check out our favorites, organized by subject.


The Technology Behind The 2014 World Cup [Infographic]


This infographic comes courtesy of the folks at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, whom we imagine know what they’re talking about.
For your viewing pleasure, the entire infographic can be found . 
Still curious about some of the things you see in the graphic? You can read Popular Science's reporting on the mind-controlled exoskeleton that helped make the first kick, as well as the latest officialWorld Cup

This infographic comes courtesy of the folks at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, whom we imagine know what they’re talking about.

For your viewing pleasure, the entire infographic can be found 

Still curious about some of the things you see in the graphic? You can read Popular Science's reporting on the mind-controlled exoskeleton that helped make the first kick, as well as the latest officialWorld Cup

Anonymous said: I'm kind of new to the whole tumblr thing and I was wondering if you could make a list of your top five to ten science blogs? I'd really appreciate it

s-c-i-guy:

Sure why the heck not!

And this list is in no particular order

asapscience

afro-dominicano

humanoidhistory

itsfullofstars

crookedindifference

skunkbear

sagansense

science-junkie

spaceplasma

molecularlifesciences

teded

betterknowamicrobe

mindblowingscience

thebrainscoop

sciencesoup

scienceisbeauty

thatssoscience

thatscienceguy

currentsinbiology

sci-universe

scinerds

christinetheastrophysicist

jtotheizzoe

popsci

I realize this is a little bit more than ten but I’m sure you’ll live

A list of science Tumblrs for all to see

(For a while I was wondering why we weren’t on the list :p )

Thursday, June 12, 2014

washingtonpost:

Even astronauts have World Cup fever.

Here’s the full clip of astronauts having fun up in space.

And if you’re curious how the space station compares in size to a soccer field (of course you are), NASA made this helpful illustration: 

Wednesday, June 11, 2014
makinaro:

By now you’ve all been swept up in the cult of personality of Eugene Goostman, the chatbot that made news when it convinced 10 out 30 judges at the University of Reading’s 2014 Turing Test that it was human, thus winning the contest. With the announcement, every news source with two hundred words to spare was quick to crown Eugene Goostman as king of bots. But we should know better by now. 
Did A Chatbot Really Pass the Turing Test?

Nope, it did not. 
Read the comic by makinaro for popsci.

makinaro:

By now you’ve all been swept up in the cult of personality of Eugene Goostman, the chatbot that made news when it convinced 10 out 30 judges at the University of Reading’s 2014 Turing Test that it was human, thus winning the contest. With the announcement, every news source with two hundred words to spare was quick to crown Eugene Goostman as king of bots. But we should know better by now. 

Did A Chatbot Really Pass the Turing Test?

Nope, it did not. 

Read the comic by makinaro for popsci.

On June 1st, Fabien Cousteau, grandson of Jacques Cousteau, swam down to the last existing undersea habitat research lab in the world, Aquarius, in the Florida Keys. He’ll live there for 31 days, which is a day longer than the time his grandfather spent living in his undersea habitat, Conshelf II, roughly 50 years ago.

Last Thursday, Popular Science video chatted with Fabien to ask him about life under water, including how he deals with constant humidity, cramped quarters, and two atmospheres of pressure. 

(In the video above, a shark swims past the porthole at 6:43.)

You’re also probably wondering, what happens to the human body—physically and psychologically—during a month under the sea? Well, Brian Lam explains it all here. 

Plus, head over to the site for a tour of the underwater lab Aquarius, lead by Fabien.

skunkbear:

This is what a garden looks like in space.
This is what a space garden looks likeAstronauts who spend months on end in space sure do miss their greens. That’s why NASA is embarking on a program to get astronauts growing their own food. First stop is the International Space Station and a vegetable production system called Veg-01, or “Veggie.”
Full story here.
Image courtesy of NASA

On a very relevant note and expanding the question further, what would people in permanent space colonies eat? Surely not just greens?

Once settled on another planet, colonists would likely start with hydroponic farming, using small-stature or dwarf cultivars that can be tightly packed together.
Later on, the colonists would move to carbohydrate-heavy crops like sweet potatoes, rice, and wheat, and after that they might plant protein and oil-rich crops, such as soybeans and peanuts.

Read the rest of the answer here. 

skunkbear:

This is what a garden looks like in space.

This is what a space garden looks likeAstronauts who spend months on end in space sure do miss their greens. That’s why NASA is embarking on a program to get astronauts growing their own food. First stop is the International Space Station and a vegetable production system called Veg-01, or “Veggie.”

Full story here.

Image courtesy of NASA

On a very relevant note and expanding the question further, what would people in permanent space colonies eat? Surely not just greens?

Once settled on another planet, colonists would likely start with hydroponic farming, using small-stature or dwarf cultivars that can be tightly packed together.

Later on, the colonists would move to carbohydrate-heavy crops like sweet potatoes, rice, and wheat, and after that they might plant protein and oil-rich crops, such as soybeans and peanuts.

Read the rest of the answer here. 

Tuesday, June 10, 2014